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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
is allowing family members of u.s. government workers in japan to evacuate. arrangements are being made for charter flights. an earlier white house order told americans in japan to stay at least 50 miles away from the fukushima nuclear plant. japanese military helicopters have been dropping water on that crippled plant today. they're hoping the aerial assault will cool off the reactors and avoid a total meltdown. >>> the japanese stock market opened lower today. taking back yesterday's gains. the yen soared to a new high against the dollar on the currency markets. >>> finally, while the world watches the tragic events in japan, many wonder what we can do here to help. this includes one little massachusetts girl. >> she sprang into action selling her most precious items in hopes that she can help those who need it the most. here's tricia taskey of our affiliate wggb. >> here. >> this is autumn. and it's going to be hard for me to give her away. >> reporter: 7-year-old sage freeman is parting with some of her toys. >> this is tigger. >> tigger is going to be hard. >> reporter: the florenc
, water, blankets and shelter from the bitter cold. >>> the u.s. government is taking no chances with citizens and troops in japan. it is now telling all americans to stay at least 50 miles away from the crippled nuclear reactor in fukushima. our foreign affairs correspondent jill dougherty is live at the white house with more on what they're recommending to americans that are in japan right now. hey, jill. >> hey, kiran. there's been a lot of change so let's go through it. late last night the state department announcing that they're having what's called a voluntary departure for the families of people who work in three different locations, embassies and consulate and another location in japan, so that is the u.s. embassy in tokyo, the consulate in nagoya and also the fsi, foreign service institute field school in yokohama. those people are being authorized to leave. they're not being forced or ordered to leave. it's voluntary still. state department says that it will have clarter planes available for those people to leave, 3600 if necessary. alsoer this saying those charter plan
there for the u.s. dollars is $32 a bulb. >> we were inspired. we both designed a bulb and installed them here. let's see how they >>> this morning on "world news now" -- breaking news. the nuclear threat in japan forces president obama to begin american evacuations. >> and because of a meltdown risk, families of u.s. embassy employees in japan are being urged to get out. it's thursday, march 17th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> and good morning, everyone, i'm mike marusarz in for rob nelson. >> i'm peggy bunker. that late development about evacuations of u.s. embassy families comes as a japanese military takes desperate steps to avoid a nuclear meltdown. can choppers with water make any difference? >>> also ahead, tough questions about nuclear safety here in the u.s. as the president stands by his plans to build more plants. >>> also, one very personal fund-raiser for tsunami and earthquake survivors in japan. a little girl's successful plan to sell her toys in order to raise money. a very sweet story. >> it is a sweet story. >>> we begin with that urgent action to
will speak to the nation tonight to further explain the u.s. mission in libya. good morning, everyone. it is monday, march 28th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst mark halperin. you're going to be driving the week today. >> i will be doing some of that. >> national affairs editor for "new york" magazine, john heilemann and msnbc political analyst pat buchanan in the studio here this morning. i love that. >> pat in the flesh. >> you're okay after that accident. >> i hope the other people are okay. >> it doesn't sound like it. hope everyone had a good weekend. i had another trip to the e.r. what else is new? >> oh, my. >> kids. we have a lot going on today. she's fine. thanks for asking. >> you're here. >> sprained ankle. no, not me. we have a lot going on today. we talk about the president's address to the nation tonight, how the libya mission plays into the obama doctrine. i think it does. also, in the 7:00 a.m. hour we'll bring in the executive editor of "rolling stone" magazine, eric bates. "rolling stone" is out with anothe
debated a resolution that would have removed the u.s. troops from afghanistan. the vote was 93-121. this 20 minute portion of the debate. >> i rise in strong opposition. it would undermine the everett of nation's security. insanity has been described as doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. 3,000 people died on september 11 because we walked away once from afghanistan thinking that it didn't matter who controlled that country, we were wrong then, let us not make the same mistake twice. . as are as the undersecretary of testifies stated earlier this week, the threat emanating from the border of afghanistan and pakistan is not hypothetical. there is no other place in the world that contains such a concentration of senior al qaeda leaders and operational commanders. continue to allow these hostile organizations in this region -- to flourish in this region is to put the security of our friends and allies and the united states at great risk, end quote. to quit the area before we rooted out the terrorists would not only hand al qaeda a propaganda v
obama says the u.s. is actually ratcheting down involvement in libya but, still, no plans for dealing with muammar qaddafi. >> wake up. air traffic controller falls asleep on the job. if you have not heard putting lives at risk but instead of fixing that problem the f.a.a. changes the rules and another bureaucratic coverup? we report. you decide. >>clayton: and an idea to cut the deficit. tax how far you drive. a government official thinks that should be used against you. like a little old lady would not be taxed as much as briggs. could a mileage tax be on the way? muammar qaddafi -- >>dave: i am a train guy! >> it's "fox and friends" right now. >>dave: everyone, good saturday morning, heather is here this morning with us. >> great to have you. >> >>clayton: we need a vat of coffee for heather. >>dave: this is the one person on the planet and this is late for her because she usually anchors at 4:30 in the morning, so this is sleeping in. sleeping in. >>clayton: and now, the news we are following overnight because if violence continuing to rip through the muslim world, and a number of
international trade, but now some pirates put in their place by u.s. commandos. >>> plus, this guy took less than a minute to steal the loot. >> that's not very smart, but it's original. haven't seen that one yet. >> maybe we've seen too much. now the hunt for the droopy drawers bandit. >>> intense fight noting in lib. heavy gun fire, a common sound there. the uprising becoming the bloodiest in the way of unrest. front line of the fighting, smoke rising there, a possible signal of a new phase in the battle as forces loyal to libyan leader moammar gadhafi use air power to bomb rebel fighters. fierce ground battles still raging between the two, the rebels working to cut a path toward the capital city of tripoli. and this is what they're facing when they get there. those are pro-gadhafi crowds. gather not guilty tripoli's square earlier, loyalists ready to defend their leader, they say, no matter what the cost. here is one of them. >> there is nobody in this state or in this city against gadhafi. >> steve harrigan is streaming live in tripoli. steve, our question, is leader gadhafi still contro
marine in the theater has talked about the main problems, that only with u.s. direct involvement and substantial financial infusions of money -- the budget for a spans greater than the entire afghan gdp. when we leave, how will the afghan government pay for it? from his perspective, on the ground, almost entirely by u.s. supervision and u.s. financing. >> first of all, that does not give adequate credit to our afghan partners. marja, which was liberated less than a year ago, which took 4200 u.s. marines when we started, which is down now to 1600, they have been able to hold the district community council election. this is right after their great debate. it was neat stuff. this was them running this. there are 10 schools open now in marja. there were zero under the taliban. these are afghans teaching in the schools, not us. we may have to rebuild the schools, working to repair irrigation systems, the market's the use to sell exclusively illegal narcotics and weapons and explosives -- there are now about 15 markets that sell household goods, food, and clothing. these are the afghan
. >>> and more now on japan's nuclear crisis and concern about the risks from radiation. the u.s. embassy is urging people within 50 miles of the nuclear plant to evacuate. that's 1.9 million people. japanese officials have told those living within 12 to 19 miles to stay indoors. earlier, the government evacuated about 200,000 people living within a 12-mile radius. and of course the biggest risk is to workers inside the plant trying to avoid a meltdown. more from dr. begsanjay gupta. >>> an important piece of the puzzle, what are radiation levels inside the plant? we know the levels are higher inside where workers are trying to do their work. they try and protect themselves with this, a hazmat suit. they may use a mask that has a little respirator on it. these sort of things provide some help against some forms of radiation but not against the most dangerous forms of radiation like gamma radiation. there's also little sensors that they may use to find out how much radiation they're being exposed to or what the contamination is. these aren't protecting people as much as giving them in the
for -- working for the u.s. government essentially, then the private side, those workers, it was incumbent upon them, what they asked for, they didn't want to ask for so much they were going to break the company they worked for because they'd be out of luck and out of a job, but the public side doesn't have that same kind of relationship. >> no. the relationship between the public sector worker union is with a politician on the other side of the negotiating fence. in the private sector, it's a private sector union person negotiating with a corporate boss for wages and benefits and pensions, and the two are very different. the corporation must rely on profits, the politician relies on the taxpayer and tax revenue. a very different kettle of fish, with very different outcomes as we can see today. martha: that's a tricky marriage, so to speak, as we watch this all unfold. stuart varney from the fox business network and varney & co. bill: back to this weather, flooding and tornadoes leaving a path of destruction in the midwest, we watched this live during our program yesterday. this is flooding in
, and i think a certain amount of confusion about what the potential danger is to the u.s. from the nuclear plant problems in japan, and particularly as the media's been following the last few days and a sense that the possibility of a meltdown at the plant, the explosion, and emission of a large amount of radioactivity and people are concerned about the west coast of the u.s., particularly hawaii, guam, and other islands may be subject to some danger, and i wonder if you have a current sense of what that possibility is? >> i'll refer back to the statement made by the chairman of nuclear regulatory commission in looking at all the scenarios, they do not see radiation reaching the u.s. that it would be of a danger or require protective angsts, but anticipation of this, fema support with the department of energy have a system called rad net. it's been there and 24 hours a day, seven days a week monitors various channels, air, water, other types of things across the country, and so if we were to detect anything, we may detect things well below any levels that require action. we did
about recent events in japan. he said u.s. officials do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the u.s. the president visited the japanese embassy to sign a condolence book for victims of last week's earthquake and tsunami. >> i will be making a statement later this afternoon. my main purpose for being here is to communicate how heartbroken the american people are over this tragedy. we are doing everything we can to stand by our great friend and ally, japan. our deepest sympathies, or thoughts and prayers are with the families. we feel a great urgency to provide assistance to those who have been displaced from their homes, who are suffering enormously at this moment. as i said on the first day of the tragedy, i am confident that japan will rebuild. it has people who are strong and resilient, who are dedicated to their country, who are brilliant. as difficult as this time is up, i am confident that japan will emerge even stronger than before. >> [unintelligible] >> i am will discuss that this afternoon. >> thank you very much. >> after visiting the japanese embassy in washington
all of this is. on the heels of a nuclear prices in japan, south carolina here in the u.s. went to court demanding that the nuclear regulatory commission provide a permanent place to store america's waste. there are 104 operating reactors, they're scattered across 65 plants in 31 different states. if you take a look at this map, this gives you a better idea of exactly where this 63 thousand tons of spent fuel, the darker the color of the state, the more radioactive waste that state has, according to the nrc. again, we're talking about 63,000 tons of spent fuel. if you take a look, with the telestrator working, illinois is the state with most, 776 tons. coming in second place is pennsylvania. as we know, pennsylvania, the site of three mile island, the nuclear site that had zadisaste back in the late '80s. and 3,700 tons of spent fuel. pretty much a tie with north carolina and south carolina here. let me show you a map quickly that illustrates what we're talking about when we say spent fuel. these are the spent fuel pools. they're steel-lined concrete pools filled with water like
ground attacks. president obama will speak to the nation tonight to explain what role the u.s. will play in the mission in libya now that nato stepped in. the president is also expected to address concerns by both parties who say he should have consulted with congress before a military intervention. nbc's tracie potts joins us now from washington with details. good morning to you. >> reporter: veronica, good morning. good morning, everyone. the president's got a lot of questions to answer when he addresses the nation tonight. lawmakers here want to know should we even be involved in libya or should we be doing more to take down libya's leader? >> the president's going to address the nation monday night. a lot of these questions will be answered. >> reporter: questions like whether we'll handguns to rebels. >> no decision has been made about that. >> reporter: and how much the u.s. will be involved after nato takes over. >> within the next week or so, we will begin to diminish the commitment of resources. >> reporter: tonight, president obama's supposed to lay out the plan. he said gadhaf
money on its latest device. the handheld 3ds is on sale in the u.s. for $250, 3d games can be played without special glasses. it takes 3d photos and the 3ds will play 3d movies streamed from net fix this summer. nintendo is hoping to nudge the market in a new direction five years after the wii. >>> not having the glasses is a great point. >> absolutely. >> what do you have in the next half hour? >> a company that we all associate with gourmet gift baskets may be declaring bankruptcy as soon as today. >>> no kidding, wow. >>> 9news now is giving you the chance to win an ipad two. >> go to our facebook page, hit the like button and enter our great tablet give away, refer friends and that gives you a better chance of winning one for yourself. if you are already a fan, click the sweep stakes link on the left side of the page. we'll announce the winner this friday april 1st. >>> our time right now nine after the hour, a look at this morning's top stories is next. >> including details of the president's address tonight to americans about the crisis in libya. how soon u.s. forces will hand
the country on u.s. action with libya with critics on both sides of the aisle hammering about the plan. what does he need to say? a former presidential speech write are is here next. >> dave: getting bang for their buck. radio shack, make ago unusual offer. buy satellite tv, get a gun. good idea? we report you decide. >> clayton: sometimes you want to shoot your tv. your cable. introducing the thunderbolt by htc. immense power. scorching speed. the first phone strong enough to run on the fastest, most advanced 4g network in america. the two trains and a bus rider. the "i'll sleep when it's done" academic. for 80 years, we've been inspireby you. and we've been honored to walk with you to help you get where u want to be. ♪ because your moment is now. let nothing stand in your way. ♪ [ giggles ] let nohey, max.nd in your way. [ announcer ] you can help significantly extend your dog's healthy years. a groundbreaking 14-year study by purina... proves that puppy chow, then dog chow nutrition, fed properly over a lifetime, can help extend his lovable antics up to 1.8 healthy years. long live yo
concludes this article with the statement that the u.s. does not have an energy problem, it has an energy strategy problem. think about that. it's not lacking the resources. it's the strategy for how we develop our energy resources. during his campaign, president obama liked to quote dr. martin luther king, and he talked about the fierce urgency of now. and there are few issues more important or more fundamental to our nation's long-term success than a viable energy policy. people are very correct when they say that parts of this will -- will take time. parts of it will take a longer period of time, but now is nevermore fiercely urgent than when we have such an important and such a long journey ahead of us. if we're ever going to take control of our energy future, now is the time to get -- to come together, support the policies that promote abundant, affordable, clean, diverse and domestic energy. critically important to us, madam president, and i look forward to these conversations that will continue on the floor as we talk about ways that we not only work to reduce our budget, ways that
. coming up next, preparing for a handover. the changing level of u.s. involvement in libya. and the deadly super bug drugs can't fight and it's hitting california hospitals hard. we'll tell you which ones.d >> closed captioning brought to you by mancini sleepworld. >> president obama will address the nation on monday about libya. the president is expected to talk about a greater role for nato and less u.s. military involvement. some lawmakers of both parties say the president should have consulted them first before taking any military action. the president does get a big boost from a battle in libya that turned around overnight. libyan rebels are now celebrating regaining control of the eastern city. the gateway to libya's oil fields. the rebels were on the verge of defeat by muammar qaddafi forces until coalition air support turned things around. it was the fall of the city to qaddafi troops that spurred the u.n. resolution authorizing international intervention that began about a week ago. this 12-year-old boy hides while his father describes the situation they endured when the city wa
. meanwhile, the u.s. now says it has moved igts ships and aircraft away from one of the quake-stricken plants after discovering low-level radioactive contamination and "the new york times" reports that the "uss ronald reagan" passed through a radioactive cloud, causing crew members to receive a month's worth of radiation in about an hour. this is something we had a gut feeling about on friday morning as the story was unfolding and now it appears to be escalating. >> the first reports out that were none of the nuclear plants were affected. mika refused to read the script that way. you just sort of knew. if you had an 8.9 or 9.0 earthquake, these facilities could be impacted. that's the real story now. we have our newspaper segment. you look at all of the headlines here, whether it's the boston globe, if you look, this is what "the washington post" is talking about. again, japan across the top. the "usa today," they're talking about an anxious wait and it is an absolutely anxious wait. "the wall street journal," mika, when we talk about the nuclear situation, "the wall street journal" has it ri
people. the chief spokesman for the government went on television saying, we might need help of u.s. military fighting the nuclear accident. already, 750 of the nuclear plant workers had been told to leave, to find a safe place. only about 50 had remained. and now, it's believed, even they had been told to stop for a time. japanese officials had begun using helicopters to dump water on one of the reactors. now, even that idea is deemed unlikely to work. pictures this morning show the helicopters trying. they had to stop. it's believed the last 50 workers were already the final line of defense, working frantic in an all-out race. and nuclear experts tell us they're likely using full body suits with air packs, rotating in and out on strict schedules trying to minimize their exposure. radiation sickness can begin to set in rapidly at levels of 1,000 millisieverts. that's the equivalent of 25,000 chest x-rays. if exposed, the symptoms are immediate. from vomiting to a steep decline in white blood cells wiping out their immune system. right now, the radiation levels
, but the defense department video shows u.s. missles being fired off libya's coast, coalition air raids targeted gadhafi's home continue of sirte. >> we will begin diminishing the level of our engagement, the level of resources we have involved in this. as long as there's a no-fly zone and we have unique capabilities, recon innocence, surveillance, we'll have a prefnlts. >> alan: nato's new role will include upholding an embargo and enforcing a no-fly zone, president obama will speak to the nation about our involvement in libya, and abc-7 will broadcast the speech live. >> a magnitude 6.5 earthquake shook eastern japan, and a tsunami alert has been issued, but no immediate reports of damage or injury yet. the us west coast is not under any threat. more problems at the fukushima nuclear power plant. high radiation readings are complicating the job of workers trying to cool down overheated reactors after announcing the levels were 10 million times before normalless. plant operators have since apologizing, saying the levels are 100,000 times over the normal level, which is still considered dangerou
and shipping of japanese goods that come to the u.s. so much so that this tanker from japan was the first to arrive at the port of oakland today since the disaster two weeks ago. lee ann reports on the economic impact ever since. >> after china and south korea japan third largest exporter of container goods to the u.s. things like cars and auto part parts. computer and electronic product. these are the people who move those goods from the port of oakland. >> i have seen a lot of auto parts. mainly parts and machinery, al agricultural. >>reporter: electricity shortage that manufacturing plants in japan have slowed down production. then there are the damage roads and bridges that make getting goods from point a to b difficult. truck drivers at the port of oakland know they will start feeling the impact in a few week also. >> right now january february and march is like. that it's low. this year is going to be l more than that because it's miami. l that's all we have we have to wait for that. major company in silicon valley like apple already being affected. james lincoln with the
confidence. they say u.s. power plants are safe. that may not be enough to ease public concerns. new polling last week found a sharp decline in the percentage of americans who support building new nuclear plants. so far, that fear has not spread to capitol hill. lawmakers are certainly raising concerns but nuclear energy still has bipartisan support. >> i'm not persuaded that nuclear power should be deleted from the list of options that we look at. >> i wouldn't, if i were the president, sign an executive order to freeze all construction of nuclear plants as the president froze all drilling in the gulf coast after that disaster down there. >> reporter: right now there are 104 nuclear reactors across the united states. these facilities account for just 20% of the nation's electricity. far less than countries like japan and france. nuclear power there makes up 70% of the total electrical output. and developing nations such as schin that and india are moving quickly to catch up. the chinese are currently building 100 reactors. last year president obama said the u.s. cannot afford to fall behind
for a handover. changing level of the u.s. involvement in libya and a deadly super bug that is hitting california hospitals hard. >> janelle: president obama addresses the nation monday night. his weekly address is a few of the highlights of his message to america. >> we're not putting any ground forces into libya. our military has provided unique capabilities at the beginning but this is a broad international effort. our allies and partners are enforcing the no-fly zone over libya and the arms embargo at sea. qatar and the united arab i am rats have agreed the responsibility is transferred from the united states to our partners. >> the president has been getting criticism for members of congress for not consulting with them. >> libyan rebels have regained control of the eastern city. a gateway to libya's oil fields. the rebels were on verge of defeat until coalition air support turned things around. it was the fall of the city that spurred the u.n. resolution authorizing international intervention which begin a week ago. a 12-year-old boy, you can see here, hides his tears, while his father desc
partner of the u.s. paralympic team. jim: that's short. price snaps it long and in the hands of leslie and the shot, no! greg g.: and that's how things wound down in charlotte a few moments ago as we welcome you back to new york, everyone and "road to the final four" here on cbs. greg gumbel along with greg anthony, kenny smith and charles barkley. the washington huskies moving on, barely. charles: they played very well. isaiah thomas dominated the game. when they play north carolina, the scoreboard operator better get a good night's sleep. greg g.: they will play north carolina on sunday. v.c.u. comes out of the first round of play. they beat georgetown and they will play purdue. a game still in action on trutv. a 56-46 lead for syracuse over indiana state. 7:15 to play there and another final score earlier this evening, illinois over unlv 73-62 and illinois will play kansas on sunday. kenny: a tough loss for unlv. greg g.: tomorrow morning at 11:00 eastern time, get a head start on your ncaa viewing day. then at noon eastern or cbs, west virginia against kentucky. at 2:45, ucla again
: good morning. my name is john. i am a u.s. navy veteran. i ever present all veterans -- in a what, we have to stop giving these people so much attention, ok? and then they hide behind god and all of his laws. stop being phony, ok? i live my life. i did not hurt anybody, ok, and i can never going to hurt anybody. in a what? what a shame? host: if you could hold on for just a second. we will let john finish. caller: one minute, please. it is a shame our politicians to not have enough common sense that they cannot come up with a law that will prevent these idiot people from protesting against people who died for the preservation of what they get to do to begin with. if it's kotite in the first amended to this argument. -- tie in the first amendment. caller: i understand freedom of speech is first amendment. i cannot come over here and say you are a horrible person and use all kinds of language and expect not have any consequence. that is what the westboro church -- they need to have consequences. and i prayed to god that god brings the wrath right down on them and hope some sick. in this
at 12:18 pm we are waiting for this big earthquake, resulting in a tsunami, to hit u.s. shores momentarily. we will keep you posted. we have about 10 minutes left with congressmen kevin yoder. henry is a democrat. you are on the air. caller: kevin, i would like for you, if you are really serious about doing something about the budget, first of all, i would like you to take some leadership and introduce a bill that would, of course, cut or make sure that congress pays for more of their medical, make sure the congress takes a pay cut, introduce a bill that will cut subsidies to all states for every dollar that each state sends to the federal government. they should get a dollar back. there are no states that should have any kind of an advantage over another state. the republicans do not like government. then cut all of your government contracts. do not accept any more than your state sends in federal dollars. go to the 400 richest people who have more than 155 million people in this country in wealth and ask them to pay their fair share of the taxes. if you are not just trying to
to scale back u.s. military involvement in libya. >>> and tiger woods tees off in the arnold palmer invitational this afternoon. it has been a year since woods won a pro golf tournament. >> you know he's saying, please, let me win something. >> hope his putter works. >> oh, boy. okay. >>> finally, as you know, we do love animal stories around here. so, we could not pass up the chance to tell you about a cat in england named smokey. smokey the cat. >> name smokey the cat. reminds me of the movie "friday." they say when a cat is happy he purrs. smokey must be the happiest cat in the world. nick watt has the story. >> reporter: smokey seems pretty normal. fury, friendly, but that's because the volume's down. crank it -- unreal. and almost constant. is smokey the loudest cat in the world? 92 decibels. most cats peak at 20. but what does 92 decibels mean? well, it's louder than a washing machine. that's 70. about the same of a truck engine idling across the street and just a fraction less than what you would hear from a jet engine as a plane comes in to land. who's a nois
our defense department knows how to do this but i think, you have to take out u.s. troops first before we can do anything. regional stability is extremely important and you have to bring in the region and talk about how you move forward. but that means our troops have to get out. and the cost, in addition the human costs, you look at the dollars, the trailians trailia- trillions of dollars and as longs war going on that isn't going to happen. >> charlie: you want legislation to cut off funding -- >> cut off funding for future operations in a began stan. i want funding there to protect the troops. anything they need, they performed well. they should be reported so whatever it takes to protect and support the troops we need to fund as well as the contractors. but we need to send this funding in and we need to do that and use the funding whatever we appropriate to begin withdrawing and we need to do that quickly. not in 2011 but we need to begin a massive drop down. >> charlie: what do you think of general gates. >> he's been very bold and he's made some statements and tried to help mo
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)